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ACR accepting comments on biochar methodology for carbon credits

By Erin Voegele | October 02, 2013

The American Carbon Registry has opened a public comment period on a new methodology to measure carbon reductions associated with biochar produced via the pyrolysis process. The methodology was prepared by The Climate trust, the Prasino Group, the International Biochar Initiative, and Carbon Consulting.

According to the ACR, the methodology quantifies and credits both the avoided emissions from combustion or decomposition of biomass in the baseline and enhanced carbon sequestration at sites where biochar is applied. The methodology considers biochar produced from forestry and agricultural residues, municipal solid waste (MSW) and other biomass-based materials.  

The methodology essentially outlines the conditions necessary in order for carbon offset credits to be generated for biochar. The ACR, a nonprofit enterprise of Winrock International, is a carbon offset program that is active in the voluntary carbon market and is an approved offset project registry for the California Cap-and-Trade Program.

To generate carbon offsets for biochar, a project must utilize feedstocks that meet the definition of biomass residue. Credits cannot be generated for biochar made from purpose-grown crops. Among other requirements, the ratio of hydrogen to organic carbon must be less than 0.7 according to a test method outlined by the International Biochar Initiative. The resulting biochar must also be applied to land or mixed with another soil, compost or amendment medium. In addition, the methodology sets a 2 inch limit on the size of biochar particles.

The full biochar methodology can be downloaded from the ACR website. The organization is inviting comments from its members, project proponents and other interested parties. Comments are due Oct. 25. 

 

 

 

3 Responses

  1. Erich J Knight

    2013-10-03

    1

    I will leave aside for now the concomitant benefits of biochars for Soil Carbon Sequestration, building soil biodiversity & nitrogen efficiency, in situ remediation of toxic agents, and how modern thermal conversion systems are closed-loop, no significant emissions with a 1/3 carbon negative energy cycle to focus on Biochar as a feed supplement cutting the Carbon Hoof, Paw, Fin and Poultry foot prints of livestock. The First reports from Dr Takeo Takahashi at the 2008 Asian Biochar conference, (http://www.anzbiochar.org/AP%20BioChar%20Conference-may09.pdf) described Japan's work with sick, thought dead, battery raised chickens being rejuvenated. That char fed laying hen's eggs had no odor, fetching twice the market price in Japan. Read more at the Japan Biochar Association site; http://www.geocities.jp/yasizato/pioneer.htm Then from the EU, the Delinat Institute reported major health benefits in cattle & poultry, now they have quantified data collected from 80 farms, thousands of animals showing far better feed conversion ratios, curing chronic Botulism, extremely low bio-counts in milk, binding Estrogenic steroid hormones in manure, and leave it to the Germans & Swiss, literaly taking the stink out of Manure. This hard data and all other aspects of Biochar soil technology will be presented October. 13-17, at the University of Massachusetts, during the 2013 USBI North American Biochar Symposium http://pvbiochar.org/2013-symposium/

  2. Heath Van Eaton

    2013-10-16

    2

    Here's my comments and I've been in the biomass technology and business development sector for about 19 years: 1. To generate carbon offsets for biochar, a project must utilize feedstocks that meet the definition of biomass residue. Credits cannot be generated for biochar made from purpose-grown crops. Comment: makes sense and this follows globally established LCA guidelines. 2. Among other requirements, the ratio of hydrogen to organic carbon must be less than 0.7 according to a test method outlined by the International Biochar Initiative. Comment: first off, why the 0.7 number? Will this limit overall participation? 3. The resulting biochar must also be applied to land or mixed with another soil, compost or amendment medium. Comment: this needs expanded so the bio-char can be used in more applications. 4. In addition, the methodology sets a 2 inch limit on the size of biochar particles. Comment: change this since different industrial processes and feedstocks will yield varying sizes of particles. Example, wheat straw byproducts that are leftover after harvest. Thank you, Heath Van Eaton President, WyoComp

  3. keeshawn

    2013-10-09

    3

    Where did this happen?

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