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A Busy Week for International Development

I’ve marveled this week at burgeoning international biomass development. While foreign biomass industry advancement isn’t new, this week seems to set itself apart from the rest in the sheer number of biomass-related announcements.
By Lisa Gibson | December 23, 2011

I’ve marveled this week at burgeoning international biomass development. While foreign biomass industry advancement isn’t new, this week seems to set itself apart from the rest in the sheer number of biomass-related announcements.

Perhaps my favorite news coming from far and away is the establishment of ‘Biomass in Bosnia and Herzegovina,’ and not just because I haven’t heard anyone mention Herzegovina since my seventh grade geography class. The new association held its inaugural assembly recently, where more than 20 companies and individuals signed the founding document and subsequently collaborated on establishing the basic structures necessary for the group to function successfully.

The organization will work to establish sustainable biomass markets and enhance the cooperation between sector representatives and authorities, international organizations and similar associations. So what types of biomass are abundant in Bosnia and Herzegovina? I wondered that, too, and found out both countries are rich in forestry and wood processing, as well as agriculture. Naturally, that leaves open opportunities for forest and agricultural residues, and those feedstocks provide a solid foundation for the production of heat and power. It looks like they’re well on their way to meeting their goal of 20 percent renewable energy by 2020 and 30 percent biomass energy with 10 percent efficiency increase by 2030. Way to go, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Herzegovina. It’s just so fun to say.

And I’m not done yet. Elsewhere, BDI – BioEnergy International AG is developing a biogas plant in Germany and another in France; ESWE BioEnergie GmbH is building a 43 MW, woody biomass combined-heat-and-power plant in Wiesbaden, Germany; Danish Stirling DK commissioned a woody biomass CHP plant at a spa in Tabarz, Germany. And of course the development continues to impress in the U.K., with a bevy of projects announced each week, including a 32 MW biomass power plant at a wood panel factory in Wrexham, North Wales.

I’m almost done. Bear with me.

Beyond individual plant development this week, biomass power providers in India are working together to get annual revisions of the variable cost component of fixed power supply rates. They’re concerned about the rise in raw material costs that have recently forced some plants to shut down, and pleaded their case this week to the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission.

In Malaysia, the recently released National Biomass Strategy 2020 targets wealth creation for the palm oil industry and strongly reflects the tremendous potential for biomass applications in that industry. The sector produces about 80 million metric tons of biomass per year that could go toward pellets, power and heat, biofuels or bio-based chemicals.

I’m going to end this here before I need to start separating it into chapters. I think you see my point. It’s exciting to see so much development abroad when we in the U.S. are seeing a bit of a lull surrounding uncertainty in regulations and incentives.

 

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