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DOE announces investment in 4 advanced biofuel projects

By U.S. DOE | July 01, 2013

Building on President Obama’s plan to cut carbon pollution and announced this week, the U.S. DOE has announced four research and development projects to bring next generation biofuels on line faster and drive down the cost of producing gasoline, diesel and jet fuels from biomass. The projects – located in Oklahoma, Tennessee, Utah and Wisconsin – represent a $13 million Energy Department investment.  

“By partnering with private industry, universities and our national labs, we can increase America’s energy security, bolster rural economic development and cut harmful carbon pollution from our cars, trucks and planes,” said Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. “As the President made clear in his plan to cut carbon pollution, partnerships like these will help move our economy towards cleaner, more efficient forms of energy that lower our reliance on foreign oil.”

In the United States, the transportation sector accounts for two-thirds of total U.S. oil consumption and one-third of our nation’s total greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrocarbon-based biofuels made from non-food feedstocks, waste materials and algae can directly replace gasoline and other fuels in our gas tanks and refineries. The Energy Department continues to take steps to speed the development of clean, renewable biofuels, with the goal of producing cost-competitive drop-in biofuels at $3 per gallon by 2017.

The research projects announced today build on the Obama Administration's broader efforts to accelerate the next generation of biofuels by bringing down costs, improving performance and identifying effective, non-food feedstocks and conversion technologies. These projects will help maximize the amount of renewable carbon and hydrogen that can be converted to fuels from biomass and improve the separation processes in bio-oil production to remove non-fuel components – further lowering production costs.
The projects selected for negotiation include:

Ceramatec (up to $3.3 million; Salt Lake City, Utah):  Ceramatec will utilize an efficient electrochemical deoxygenation process to develop cost-effective technology to separate oxygen from bio-oil. This project will help produce hydrocarbon products suitable for further processing in conventional petroleum refineries.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (up to $2.1 million; Oak Ridge, Tenn.): Oak Ridge National Laboratory will use a microbial electrolysis process to efficiently remove the hydrogen from the water found in bio-oil.  This technology will help reduce the corrosivity of bio-oil and improve the efficiency of converting hydrogen and biomass to biofuels.  The University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Georgia Institute of Technology, Pall Corporation, OmniTech International and FuelCellsEtc will also participate in this project.

University of Oklahoma (up to $4 million; Norman, Okla.): The University of Oklahoma will investigate two methods – thermal fractionation and supercritical solvent extraction – to maximize the amount of renewable carbon and hydrogen that can be extracted from biomass and converted to a refinery-compatible intermediate and suitable for final upgrading to a transportation fuel.  The multidisciplinary research team includes experts in catalysis, separation, life-cycle analysis and techno-economic assessment.

Virent Inc. (up to $4 million; Madison, Wis.): Virent will develop an innovative separation process which uses its BioForming technology to efficiently convert carbon from lignocellulosic biomass into hydrocarbon fuels. Virent will work to improve the overall carbon conversion efficiency of biomass – helping to reduce the cost of producing hydrocarbon biofuels that work with our existing transportation fuel infrastructure and are capable of meeting the Renewable Fuel Standard.  Idaho National Laboratory will also bring their feedstock pre-processing capabilities to the project.

 

 

1 Responses

  1. mike

    2013-07-31

    1

    New Innovative Technology for Low Cost Monatomic Hydrogen and Biofuels Hydrogen fuel cells are emerging as key players in the clean energy landscape of the future, except for one problem: it takes a lot of energy to make hydrogen (H2-molecular), and here in the US, the preferred source of that energy appears to be fresh water, an un-reliable, expensive and scarce critical life giving resource. That's hardly a sustainable solution considering fresh water which is used for farming, households, and the support of the world's populations. API researchers have been turning their attention to renewable energy for producing rare low-cost Monatomic Hydrogen and Biofuels from Seawater, Biomass, and Natural Gas. The most recent development is a low-cost ECP-AMF dissociation plasma physics technology that can produce extremely high volumes of monatomic hydrogen. Electro Magnetically Coupled – Atomic Mass Filtering (ECP-AMF) developed by Advanced Plasma Industries Inc. can dissociate Sea Water, Biomass materials (wood, grass, wheat, corn, algae, etc.), Coal and Natural gas into Monatomic hydrogen (1H = 3.5 times the energy of regular market hydrogen H2-molecular). The process then takes the monatomic hydrogen and carbon and re-associates the elements to manufacture synthetic hydrocarbons like kerosene, diesel, gasoline, and lubricating oil at prices well below current market prices. A SAFE, CLEAN, AND ABUNDANT Renewable Energy. Electro Magnetically Coupled – Atomic Mass Filtering (ECP-AMF) uses solar, wind, hydroelectric, nuclear input energy to power the dissociation of sea water, coal, natural gas, or biomass molecules into monatomic hydrogen, carbon oxygen, and many other atomic species as required. ECP-AMF produces renewable ready to use fuels, thereby, having a huge impact on energy markets by providing a path to cost-competitive clean fuels needed for combustion engines, jet fuels, fuel cells, and power plants. That in turn would give the world's energy industries a low-cost, alternative to conventional fuels that would be SAFER, CLEANER, AND ABUNDANT. The techniology has been evaluated by DOE, DOD, and US Army Corp. of Engineers. API expects to complete their first prototype in the the fourth quarter of 2014. D506 available on request.

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