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California issues 2012 Bioenergy Action Plan

By Erin Voegele | August 24, 2012

California has released its 2012 Bioenergy Action Plan, which is designed to accelerate clean energy development, job creation, and protection of public health and safety. The plan was developed by state agencies and outside experts under the leadership of Gov. Jerry Brown’s office.

State agencies responsible for developing and implementing the plan include the Natural Resources Agency, Department of Food and Agriculture, California Environmental Protection Agency, California Public Utilities Commission, California Energy Commission, Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, CalRecycle and the State Water Resources Control Board.

 “Swift action on bioenergy will create jobs, increase local clean energy supplies, and help businesses grow in California,” said California Natural Resources Secretary John Laird. “Increasing bioenergy opportunities will also help California meet its climate change goals and protect public health and safety.”

The plan contains more than 50 recommended actions to increase the sustainable use of organic waste, expand research and development of bioenergy facilities, reduce permitting and regulatory challenges, and address economic barriers to bioenergy development.

The 2012 Bioenergy Action Plan updates last year’s plan, and provides a more detailed action plant to achieve several goals, including:

  • - Increasing sustainable energy production from organic waste
  • -  Encouraging development of diverse bioenergy technologies that increase electricity generation, combined-heat-and-power facilities, renewable natural gas, and renewable liquid fuels for transportation and fuel cell applications
  • - Creating jobs and simulating economic development
  • - Reducing fire danger, improving air and water quality, and reducing waste

 

Major recommended actions in the plan include:

  • - Increasing research and development of diverse bioenergy technologies and applications
  • - Continuing to develop  and make accessible information about the availability of organic waste and opportunities for bioenergy development
  • - Streamlining and consolidating permitting of bioenergy facilities
  • - Assessing and monetizing the economic, energy, safety, environmental and other benefits of biomass
  • - Facilitating access to transmission, pipelines and other distribution networks

 

A fully copy of the plan can be downloaded from the California Natural Resources Agency 

 

 

 

1 Responses

  1. Siri

    2012-09-09

    1

    Searchinger's debate ptarner agreed that we need this fix: I can state without qualification that I agree with the premise of Tim's recent article that there is a major flaw in current and proposed accounting systems for carbon. Electric cars are a case of which comes first, the chicken or the egg? Should we wait for low carbon electricity before building electric cars, and will electric cars create a demand for low carbon electricity? It is a moot point because, from a global warming perspective, if we don't get rid of coal, it won't matter what you drive. whether his models can show They are not all his models. Attempts to single out and make an example out of one researcher by publicly denigrating him is starting to backfire. This isn't a one man show, not by any stretch of the imagination: ..Roughly a dozen major scientific assessments have now noted that because any use of productive land to produce biofuels has a high risk of creating large emissions through land-use change, we shouldn't be pursuing that route. Among these studies are those by our National Academy of Sciences, SCOPE, a special U.K. government review of biofuels called the Gallagher Report, Dutch reviews, and studies by the Joint Research Centre of the European Union.

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