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BTEC webinar to address IB MACT, control questions

By Lisa Gibson | March 07, 2011

With its nose still buried deep in the paperwork surrounding the U.S. EPA’s recently released final MACT rule, the biomass industry undoubtedly is weighed down with questions about how it will be affected.

The Biomass Thermal Energy Council will host a webinar March 17 to address specific questions related to air emissions, MACT and control technologies for thermal applications. "Biomass Air Quality: Measuring, Controlling, and Regulating Emissions” is free of charge and will include a review of the MACT rule; a comparison of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants from different biomass end uses; new studies and tools for calculating biomass emissions; exploration of pollution control technologies for biomass thermal technologies; and a question and answer session with the speakers. Those speakers include: Jim Eddinger of the EPA’s Energy Strategies Group; Carrie Lee, staff scientist with the Stockholm Environment Institute; John Hinckley, principle consultant with Resource Systems Group; and moderator Joseph Seymour, BTEC program coordinator for policy and government affairs.

The final MACT rules were released in February and include standards for four source categories—major source industrial, commercial and institutional boilers and process heaters; area source industrial, commercial and institutional boilers; commercial and industrial solid waste incinerators; and sewage sludge incinerators—as well as an updated definition of solid waste, crucial in determining which rules a technology will fall under. With scaled back and decreased standards in some areas related to biomass and increased in others, questions linger as to how the rules will affect individual installations.

To register for the event, visit www2.gotomeeting.com/register/151817107.

 

 

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